What is acne vulgaris?

Acne vulgaris is a common chronic skin disease involving blockage and/or inflammation of pilosebaceous units (hair follicles and their accompanying sebaceous gland). Acne can present as noninflammatory lesions, inflammatory lesions, or a mixture of both, affecting mostly the face but also the back and chest.

What is the difference between acne and acne vulgaris?

Acne vulgaris is the common form of acne, characterised by a mixed eruption of inflammatory and non-inflammatory skin lesions (see all the acne types). You may prefer to call acne “pimples”, “spots” or “zits”.

Why acne vulgaris is caused?

Acne develops when sebum — an oily substance that lubricates your hair and skin — and dead skin cells plug hair follicles. Bacteria can trigger inflammation and infection resulting in more severe acne.

What does acne vulgaris look like?

Whiteheads (closed comedones) are flesh-colored or whitish palpable lesions 1 to 3 mm in diameter; blackheads (open comedones) are similar in appearance but with a dark center. Pustules are elevated, usually yellow-topped lesions that contain pus. Scattered pustules appear on the face of this person with acne.

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Can acne vulgaris be cured?

While acne, commonly called acne vulgaris or acne rosacea, is not curable, it is treatable. Mild acne can be properly managed with the help of your dermatologist or doctor.

What bacteria causes acne vulgaris?

The anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes is believed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of the common skin disease acne vulgaris.

What is the fastest way to cure acne vulgaris?

First-line treatment for mild acne vulgaris includes benzoyl peroxide or a topical retinoid, or a combination of topical medications including topical antibiotics. Tetracyclines are the preferred oral antibiotic, and doxycycline and minocycline have been shown to be more effective than tetracycline.

Is acne vulgaris fungal or bacterial?

What is it? Acne vulgaris, otherwise known as (bacterial) acne, is the most common acne type we have come to know. It refers to a wide array of acne types, some of which being cystic, papules, pustules, nodules, and comedones, commonly known as whiteheads and blackheads (Keri, 2018).

How do you prevent acne vulgaris?

There are many things a person can do to prevent pimples and other forms of acne, including:

  1. Wash the face twice daily. …
  2. Refrain from harsh scrubbing. …
  3. Keep hair clean. …
  4. Refrain from popping or picking at pimples. …
  5. Apply topical treatments. …
  6. Consider topical retinoids. …
  7. Talk to a dermatologist about antibiotics.

What are the 4 types of acne?

The last 4 types—papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts—are types of inflammatory acne that can be harder to treat.

How many people in the US have acne vulgaris?

ACNE AFFECTS between 40 million and 50 million individuals in the United States. Although acne mainly affects adolescents, it is also present in children and adults.

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Is acne vulgaris a virus?

A specific species of bacteria, Propionibacterium acnes, is a major cause of the unpleasant, sometimes disfiguring disease doctors call acne vulgaris. The bacteria live inside the pits in the skin that contain hair follicles and sweat glands.

What is the drug of choice for acne?

Oral medications

Usually the first choice for treating acne is a tetracycline (minocycline, doxycycline) or a macrolide (erythromycin, azithromycin). A macrolide might be an option for people who can’t take tetracyclines, including pregnant women and children under 8 years old.