Can your GP check your moles?

If you’re worried about any of your moles then you should always get them checked by a doctor. You can make an appointment to see your GP, and if needed, they can refer you to a clinic at your local hospital. Or you may choose to have your moles checked privately.

Can a doctor tell if a mole is cancerous just by looking at it?

Unfortunately, you can’t tell by looking at a mole whether it’s cancerous or what type it is. It could very well be a normal skin spot with an abnormal appearance. A dermatologist can’t always tell the difference either.

Can I see a GP for skin?

You should see your GP if you notice a change in your skin that isn’t normal for you. Even if you’re worried, you shouldn’t delay seeing them. Your worry is unlikely to go away if you don’t make an appointment.

What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.

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Can a GP diagnose melanoma?

GPs and skin cancer clinics diagnose skin cancer with similar accuracy. Both GPs and skin cancer clinics get it right about 50 per cent of the time, based on a measure of the number of skin lesions removed per one diagnosis of skin cancer. For melanoma, both get it right around 5 per cent of the time.

Why is it so hard to get a dermatology appointment?

One major reason is that there simply aren’t enough dermatologists available. A cap on medical residency training, an increase in demand for new treatments, and awareness of skin diseases also cause a shortage in available dermatologists.

When should I be concerned about a spot on my skin?

See a board-certified dermatologist if you spot anything changing, itching, or bleeding on your skin. New, rapidly growing moles, or moles that itch, bleed, or change color are often early warning signs of melanoma and should be examined by a dermatologist.

Can GPS biopsy skin?

The skin biopsy is a simple but essential clinical skill of the general practitioner. Performed properly, it can be quick and comfortable for the patient, and yield a very high level of diagnostic information. Performed incorrectly, it can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment for the patient.

How do I know if my mole is bad?

It’s important to get a new or existing mole checked out if it:

  1. changes shape or looks uneven.
  2. changes colour, gets darker or has more than 2 colours.
  3. starts itching, crusting, flaking or bleeding.
  4. gets larger or more raised from the skin.

Is melanoma a death sentence?

Metastatic melanoma was once almost a death sentence, with a median survival of less than a year. Now, some patients are living for years, with a few out at more than 10 years. Clinicians are now talking about a ‘functional cure’ in the patients who respond to therapy.

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How do you know if you caught melanoma early?

Any change in size, shape, color or elevation of a spot on your skin, or any new symptom in it, such as bleeding, itching or crusting, may be a warning sign of melanoma.

Can a GP remove a melanoma?

If melanoma is suspected, you should have an excisional biopsy. This will either be done by your GP or they will refer you to a dermatologist or surgeon.

Who to see to get moles checked?

If you have any of these, your doctor can refer you to a skin specialist (dermatologist) who can show you how to check your skin each month for abnormal moles. Some people have a much higher than normal risk of melanoma and should have regular checks by a skin cancer specialist.

Who should I go to for a mole check?

If you notice changes in a mole’s color or appearance, you should have a dermatologist evaluate it. You also should have moles checked if they bleed, ooze, itch, appear scaly, or become tender or painful.