Can your GP check moles?

What happens during your GP appointment. Your doctor will look at your mole or abnormal area of skin. They might: measure it with a ruler or against a marker scale.

Can you get moles checked at GP?

If you’re worried about any of your moles then you should always get them checked by a doctor. You can make an appointment to see your GP, and if needed, they can refer you to a clinic at your local hospital. Or you may choose to have your moles checked privately.

Can a doctor tell if a mole is cancerous just by looking at it?

Unfortunately, you can’t tell by looking at a mole whether it’s cancerous or what type it is. It could very well be a normal skin spot with an abnormal appearance. A dermatologist can’t always tell the difference either.

Can a pharmacist check a mole?

If you have concerns regarding a mole or lesion on your body, you should have this checked. You should either see your GP, or you can simply visit a local pharmacy delivering the mole scanning service in partnership with ScreenCancer. In the pharmacy you will be asked to complete a consent form with some personal data.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Quick Answer: What test shows skin cancer?

When should I see a doctor about a mole?

If you have any moles that are larger than most, have smudgy or irregular edges, are uneven in colour or have some pinkness, you should see a doctor and get them checked. Any moles that appear newly in adulthood should be checked. The most concerning sign, however, is a changing mole.

What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.

Can a GP diagnose melanoma?

GPs and skin cancer clinics diagnose skin cancer with similar accuracy. Both GPs and skin cancer clinics get it right about 50 per cent of the time, based on a measure of the number of skin lesions removed per one diagnosis of skin cancer. For melanoma, both get it right around 5 per cent of the time.

What does a cancerous mole feel like?

Also, when melanoma develops in an existing mole, the texture of the mole may change and become hard or lumpy. The skin lesion may feel different and may itch, ooze, or bleed, but a melanoma skin lesion usually does not cause pain.

Can I send a picture of a mole to a doctor?

You can capture photos of suspicious moles or marks and track them yourself, or send them off to a dermatologist for assessment.

Can a nurse check moles?

Your skin cancer specialist or nurse can examine your skin. They are trained to look out for moles that may be starting to become cancerous. If you have any moles that could be a melanoma, they can remove them at the clinic.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Frequent question: Do fried foods cause pimples?

How do you know when a mole is concerned?

It’s important to get a new or existing mole checked out if it:

  • changes shape or looks uneven.
  • changes colour, gets darker or has more than 2 colours.
  • starts itching, crusting, flaking or bleeding.
  • gets larger or more raised from the skin.

What to watch for with moles?

What Should I Look for When Examining My Moles?

  • Asymmetry: One half of the mole does not match the other half.
  • Border: The border or edges of the mole are ragged, blurred, or irregular.
  • Color: The mole has different colors or it has shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white, or red.

What happens at a dermatology appointment for moles?

A skin specialist (dermatologist) or plastic surgeon will examine the mole and the rest of your skin. They may remove the mole and send it for testing (biopsy) to check whether it’s cancerous. A biopsy is usually done using local anaesthetic to numb the area around the mole, so you will not feel any pain.

What doctor checks moles?

If you have a mole that concerns you, your family doctor can usually let you know if it’s normal or needs further investigation. He or she may then refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin disorders (dermatologist) for diagnosis and treatment.