Can a pharmacist look at a mole?

Will a pharmacist check a mole?

The ScreenCancer process

If you have concerns regarding a mole or lesion on your body, you should have this checked. You should either see your GP, or you can simply visit a local pharmacy delivering the mole scanning service in partnership with ScreenCancer.

Who can check my moles?

If you have any of these, your doctor can refer you to a skin specialist (dermatologist) who can show you how to check your skin each month for abnormal moles.

Can a doctor tell if a mole is cancerous just by looking at it?

Unfortunately, you can’t tell by looking at a mole whether it’s cancerous or what type it is. It could very well be a normal skin spot with an abnormal appearance. A dermatologist can’t always tell the difference either.

Can General Practitioners check moles?

In short, no. Your regular GP is qualified to diagnose skin cancers, and in most cases treat them as well. You may use a dedicated skin clinic if you wish, but in general the GPs at these clinics are no more qualified to perform skin checks than GPs at regular medical centres.

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Can dermatologists check all moles?

Dermatologists will also go over what to look for in your moles and may photograph moles that are in need of monitoring. Some dermatologists do a full-body exam in every sense of the phrase, including genital and perianal skin. Others address these areas only if a patient specifically requests them.

How do you know when a mole is concerned?

It’s important to get a new or existing mole checked out if it:

  • changes shape or looks uneven.
  • changes colour, gets darker or has more than 2 colours.
  • starts itching, crusting, flaking or bleeding.
  • gets larger or more raised from the skin.

Can I send a picture of a mole to a doctor?

You can capture photos of suspicious moles or marks and track them yourself, or send them off to a dermatologist for assessment.

What causes moles to suddenly appear?

It’s thought to be an interaction of genetic factors and sun damage in most cases. Moles usually emerge in childhood and adolescence, and change in size and color as you grow. New moles commonly appear at times when your hormone levels change, such as during pregnancy.

When should I be concerned about a mole on my child?

If a mole bleeds without reason, however, it should be checked. A mole that looks like an open sore is also worrisome. Bleeding or a break in the skin can be a sign of melanoma. Bottom line: If your child has a mole that starts to bleed or looks like an open sore, a dermatologist should examine the mole.

What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.

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What does a cancerous mole feel like?

Also, when melanoma develops in an existing mole, the texture of the mole may change and become hard or lumpy. The skin lesion may feel different and may itch, ooze, or bleed, but a melanoma skin lesion usually does not cause pain.

What does Stage 1 melanoma mean?

In Stage I melanoma, the cancer cells are in both the first and second layers of the skin—the epidermis and the dermis. A melanoma tumor is considered Stage I if it is up to 2 mm thick, and it may or may not have ulceration. There is no evidence the cancer has spread to lymph nodes or distant sites (metastasis).

Can a family doctor remove moles?

Removing benign moles can sometimes be done by your primary care doctor. Dermatologists and plastic surgeons handle more complicated cases.

How long should you wait to get a mole checked?

Everyone should check their moles, at least every 3 months. But if you have developed new moles, or a close relative has a history of melanoma, you should examine your body once a month.

Is mole removal painful?

Excision, also known as cutting, involves removing the mole and a small margin of skin using a scalpel or special surgical scissors. Before cutting the mole, your doctor will inject a local anesthetic into the mole so the removal process won’t be painful.