Do I need to see a dermatologist for athlete’s foot?

Because athlete’s foot is a skin problem, it can be treated by dermatologists. Dermatologists can also treat numerous other skin conditions and perform surgery if necessary. General Practitioners are the primary doctors you see to take care of your health problems.

Should I go to a dermatologist for athlete’s foot?

You should see a dermatologist if over-the-counter medications do not clear the condition or if it becomes worse. Your dermatologist can correctly diagnose the condition and prescribe an effective medication. Untreated, athlete’s foot can result in blisters and cracks that may lead to secondary bacterial infections.

What can a dermatologist do for athlete’s foot?

How Do You Treat Athlete’s Foot & When Should You See a Dermatologist? Most cases are effectively treated with over-the-counter antifungal creams, sprays, powders, and soaps. However, if the problem worsens or does not get better with over-the-counter treatments, see a dermatologist.

Can a dermatologist help with foot fungus?

How do dermatologists treat a fungal nail infection? Treatment usually begins with your dermatologist trimming your infected nail(s), cutting back each infected nail to the place where it attaches to your finger or toe. Your dermatologist may also scrape away debris under the nail. This helps get rid of some fungus.

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What do dermatologists prescribe for athlete’s foot?

If your athlete’s foot doesn’t respond to nonprescription products and self-care, you may need to see a doctor to get a prescription-strength cream or ointment, such as clotrimazole (Lotrisone), econazole (Ecoza, Spectazole) or ciclopirox (Loprox, Penlac).

Does a podiatrist deal with athlete’s foot?

If you are dealing with persistent or recurring athlete’s foot it’s important that you also have a podiatrist that you can turn to for answers. While this condition may seem harmless it’s important that you don’t leave it untreated. A podiatrist can provide you with the treatment you’re looking for.

When should I see a doctor for athletes foot?

If athlete’s foot symptoms continue for more than 2 weeks, it’s time to see a podiatrist. The more proactive you are, the quicker the condition will resolve.

What kills athlete’s foot instantly?

Like hydrogen peroxide, rubbing alcohol can help kill off the fungus that’s on the surface level of the skin. You can apply it directly to the affected area or soak your feet in a footbath of 70 percent rubbing alcohol and 30 percent water for 30 minutes.

Why does my athlete’s foot always come back?

There you have it: the two main reasons your fungal infections keep returning. You stop using your medications too soon. So that the topical treatments don’t have the chance to fully stamp out the fungal infection. You’re choosing the wrong athlete’s foot medication.

Should I wear socks to bed with athlete’s foot?

Wearing socks to bed can help prevent transmission of the fungus. Even if you avoid contact, your partner can still develop athlete’s foot if you walk around the house barefoot.

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How long does athlete’s foot last?

How Long Does Athlete’s Foot Last? Most mild cases of athlete’s foot clear up within 2 weeks. But treatment can go for several weeks or longer if the infection is more serious or affects the toenails.

Should you go to a dermatologist or podiatrist for toenail fungus?

If your fungus doesn’t clear up at home, you should check in with a dermatologist (a skin, hair, and nail specialist) or podiatrist (a foot doctor.) They may gently scrape under your nail to get rid of some of the fungus or send it to the lab for diagnosis. They can also prescribe stronger medicines.

Can dermatologists look at feet?

Minor cases can be resolved at home, but serious infections may require medical treatment. Your feet are your foundation, so don’t take skin issues lightly. The experienced dermatologists at each location of Family Foot and Ankle Clinic, LLC can diagnose and treat any issues affecting your feet.

What can be mistaken for athlete’s foot?

Certain conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis, among other things, can also look very much like Athlete’s foot. Sometimes, if the skin barrier is compromised, a secondary bacterial infection can occur.

Why is my athlete’s foot not going away?

Generally speaking, prescription medications are needed to treat athlete’s foot if: The infection hasn’t cleared after four weeks of self-treatment. The infection goes away but comes back (recurs). The infection is spreading to other parts of the body (such as the nails, groin, or hands).

What happens if you leave Athlete’s foot untreated?

Although athlete’s foot doesn’t cause any serious problems in people who are otherwise healthy, it normally doesn’t go away on its own. If left untreated, it can spread to a nail and cause a fungal nail infection. The infection can spread to other areas of skin, such as the hands, but that rarely happens.

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